Home > IT Management > Does your IT Value Proposition Resonate?

Does your IT Value Proposition Resonate?


Satisfying internal customers means every employee must be constantly aware that customer service is everyone’s business in IT. That constant awareness generates genuine teamwork among all departments in the IT organization: Operations, Projects Department, Support Groups, IT Infrastructure, Business Applications, Process Management, etc. This challenge emphasizes the importance of internal customer service as an IT organizational accountability. Excellent customer service doesn’t just happen because IT teams and individuals want it to, it has to mandated by IT leaders into a service model that includes specific responsibilities to perform and a standard service level to achieve.  

Revisiting your IT value proposition periodically is an important exercise for IT managers. This will help you understand the tangible and intangible elements that define and differentiate your services portfolio. For internal customers, the IT Value Proposition is the collection of services they receive upon investing in IT capabilities and services. We have to understand that it includes more than just the core IT services (like equipments, applications, and infrastructure), and even more than just good quality— it also involves the softer elements that differentiate the total service offering such as: responsiveness, innovation, collaboration and commitment. 

These are two perspectives representing the two words of the terminology “Value Proposition” — “Value” and “Proposition” – broken down into: 

  • Value (Internal Customer’s Perspective) = The benefits received by the business upon investment on IT capabilities and services.  
  • Proposition (IT’s Perspective as Service Provider) = The total offering to the business in exchange for their investment.  

Defining your IT value proposition is the first step to clearly identify how your IT services portfolio are different and better than your competitors. If you run an IT organization that is purely composed of internal employees and do not think you don’t have competitors, you are wrong. There are many 3rd party IT services providers out there who can offer the same type of service that you have. Some, I could tell you, may even offer the same level of service at a better cost than you. Outsourcing companies that provide IT services have increased and matured over the years. Advancements in technology and development of new operating paradigms have made them more accessible and acceptable. They are your competitors and they are out to get your job. If you can’t define some unique feature or benefit that makes you stand out, your internal customers may default to the other option – lower cost. And believe me, you don’t want to be forced to play the low cost game — even when you win, you lose. 

Photo courtesy of Pakorn.

Follow Glenn Remoreras on Twitter.

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  1. Vaughan Merlyn
    July 28, 2011 at 2:35 pm

    Great post, as usual! I completely agree with the importance of creating a compelling and appropriate value proposition, and revisiting it periodically – things change, either with business need, or with IT’s ability to deliver, and revisiting the value proposition can help surface either types of change.

    An issue I’ve wrestled with in working with clients is whether you can do justice to IT with a single value proposition? In many respects, IT provides three quite different types of service – running the infrastructure, running or participating in business change initiatives (projects and programs) and helping find and exploit opportunities for business innovation.

    Mapping back to the classic Treacy/Wiersema “Discipline of Market Leaders”, IT has to provide Operational Excellence, Customer Intimacy and Product Leadership/Innovation. Given that, I have sometimes found it helpful to work through multiple value propositions – sometimes even connecting each to different funding models.

  1. October 8, 2011 at 2:03 pm

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